Tag Archives: Grayson Perry’s Dream House

Grayson Perry’s Grand Design

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Sunday night saw the return of Turner Prize-winning artist Grayson Perry in a programme charting perhaps his most ambitious project yet.

Grayson Perry’s Dream House (Channel 4) follows the creation of Perry’s “most personal public work” as he takes on the challenge of designing a house inspired by his early life growing up in Essex.

With the scenes of half built structures set against green fields, surrounded by scaffolding and tarpaulin, it’s hard to not draw parallels with Grand Designs. There’s that familiar narrative of extravagant ideas, apprehensive architects and even the threat of winter descending upon the build before the roof is finished. But unlike the Channel 4 hit show, the overall focus is still very much on Perry’s artistic process. The aesthetics of the piece seem to always come before the practicalities of the building.

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Identity is often a very a prominent theme in Perry’s work and this proves to be no exception. The half-finished bricks and mortar are given a human element as Perry reveals his mythical tale of an Essex woman named Julie who serves as the inspiration behind the piece.

Like in his previous projects around class (All in the Best Possible Taste with Grayson Perry) and portraiture (Grayson Perry: Who Are You?) the piece is driven by a strong narrative element. Storytelling seems an intrinsic part of his art across the multiple mediums through which he expresses his creative visions.

However, as with his previous work, the house is not just telling the story of one individual. The narrative of Julie’s life presented through the artworks within the building also chart how this fictional individual identity merges and crosses paths with the perceived collective identity of “the ordinary Essex woman” taken from his own experiences growing up in the area.

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As with the previous programmes based around his work, there’s also the sense of a “big reveal” at the end to the people from whom Perry draws his inspiration. After the piece is completed, we see Perry take a selection of Essex women named Julie to see the house and get their personal reactions to his work. As he states while waiting for the women to arrive: “it’s not enough for me to like the building. I want the women it’s about to feel it too.” There’s a sense of the artwork as a collaborative process, even if some of the collaborators were previously unaware of their contribution.

Following from his 2014 series Who Are You?, Grayson Perry’s Dream House is another genre-bending contribution to pushing the boundaries in terms of what we think arts programming should be.

But I think the real strength and originality of this kind of programming lies in how the lives of ordinary people and their stories are presented as a source of artistic inspiration, creating a unique synthesis between both television and artwork as complementary narrative forms.